Why we blog, or at least why Andrew Sullivan blogs

Andrew Sullivan in the Atlantic. I wonder if for some of us, 200811_tocit isn’t something completely different:

For centuries, writers have experimented with forms that suggest the imperfection of  human thought, the inconstancy of human affairs, and the humbling, chastening passage of time. If you compare the meandering, questioning, unresolved dialogues of Plato with the definitive, logical treatises of Aristotle, you see the difference between a skeptic’s spirit translated into writing and a spirit that seeks to bring some finality to the argument. Perhaps the greatest single piece of Christian apologetics, Pascal’s Pensées, is a series of meandering, short, and incomplete stabs at arguments, observations, insights. Their lack of finish is what makes them so compelling—arguably more compelling than a polished treatise by Aquinas.

The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan (October 16, 2008) – Why I Blog

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